Proquest Databases @ U of T – Liaison Update Forum

Links and materials from the June 14 2016 Liaison Update Forum to review methodologies and communications options related to the discontinuation of selected Proquest databases.

  • Library web site: “Libraries approach to collection building” (includes links to Confluence-posted content for library staff)
  • Presentation slides: PQC methodology June14
  • Proquest Central documentation (in Confluence)
  • Sample questions and responses from today’s discussion: Each scenario was reviewed by a small group of librarians, who developed a strategy for response.  The responses were shared with the entire meeting for additional suggestions and changes.
Scenario 1 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 1 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 2 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 2 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 3 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 3 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 4 Group 2 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 4 Group 2 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 4 Group 1 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 4 Group 1 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 5 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 5 (click to enlarge)

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Liaison Librarians Update Forum December 4 2015

The December 4 Liaison Update Forum showcased 6 lightning round presentations.  Each presentation was followed by small group discussion and an open Q&A session.  Presenters kept track of the questions (which were submitted on index cards to preserve anonymity) and have kindly recorded and shared their responses for this post.

  1. Stephanie Orfano: Thinking beyond fair dealing: Questions facing the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office (…and how you can help)  Powerpoint || Q&A
  2. Caitlin Tillman: Talking to faculty about Downsview Powerpoint || Q&A
  3. Judith Logan: Choosing the right platform for your web content Powerpoint || Q&A
  4. Carey Toane: EntComp: Establishing an entrepreneurship community of practice at UTL Powerpoint ||Q&A
  5. Dylanne Dearborn: Research data management at the U of T Powerpoint ||Q&A
  6. Gail Nichol: I’ll follow you if you’ll follow me: How Scopus can track your research impact, connect you with others in your field and keep you up to date Powerpoint || Q&A

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Talking about metrics to the University community – notes from the February 24 2015 practice exchange

Gail Nichol reviewed the recent discussions between the Library and senior university members  on how to support the acquisition of reputation metrics for use by faculty, departments and divisions.  Several librarians  shared stories of how they are currently supporting faculty and departmental requests for information.

Trends we noticed:

  • Although the H-index isn’t perfect, it has become the de facto tool for inter-institutional and inter-departmental comparisons.  Most understand its limitations.
  • Supporting faculty and departmental requests for metrics is time-intensive, with no one-size-fits-all approach.  Nevertheless, there is an important role for U of T librarians to support these kinds of requests at the divisional, departmental and individual level.
  • It is not easy to construct profiles even with tools like Web of Science and Scopus, that enable automatic generation of H-indices, so wider exposure to these kinds of tools and their capabilities is an area of interest. Be patient, there’s a learning curve.
  • Librarians are interested in further training and development to support their work in the area of metrics, and expressed interest in creating an information space to share information, strategies, and approaches to various requests.

Materials from today’s session:

 

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ORCID: What It Is and What It Can Do

On December 1 2014, Dylanne Dearborn and Stephanie Orfano presented an open session for liaison librarians on ORCID, a persistent digital identifier that disambiguates researchers names. As an identification system, ORCID enables all aspects of a  researcher’s work to be identified, while also allowing for linkage in the scholarly communications workflow.
The presentation introduced ORCID and detailed the potential benefits and uses for different stakeholder groups including researchers, university administrators, funding bodies, publishers, and the library. Examples of ORCID integration were introduced and the prospective role of ORCID in the scholarly communication process was discussed.

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September 4 2013 workshop on copyright for liaison librarians

Picture of Bobby Glushko and U of T librariansOn September 4, over 70 librarians from across the university libraries participated in the workshop “Engaging Faculty on Copyright and Open Access” with Bobby Glushko.

Here are the key documents mentioned in Bobby’s presentation:

  1. Update on Copyright Compliance at the University of Toronto (PDAD&C #15, 2013-14 September 5 2013) 
  2. U of T Fair Dealing Guidelines (PDAD&C #26, 2012-13)
  3. List of approved copyshops
  4. Access Copyright 2012 poster (summary of rights under the AC license)
  5. UTL Copyright Libguide
  6. The email address to use for copyright-related questions (tracked): copyright@library.utoronto.ca

The in-class exercises engaged participants in the challenges inherent in faculty discussions.  We compiled whiteboard notes of ways to effectively communicate with and assist faculty in the copyright conversation.

Some of the key learning points from the notes:

How can we set the stage for a helpful conversation?

  • Don’t panic. Even if their students do.
  • Less is more — less detail, more assurance. “Try not to make them afraid.”
  • Manage the complexity by offering simple services that can help them.
  • Remember, we’re not copyright cops. We provide advice and information on university policy, guidelines.
  • There may be many questions, but you don’t have to answer them all on the spot.

What do we need to ask faculty when they present a copyright question?

  • How much of this work to you (really) need?
  • If the original documents are not library copies, where do the originals come from?
  • Are these items under copyright?
  • Is the copy intended for classroom or other use?

Helpful (and easy) ideas

  • Encourage instructors to use the Bookstore as their preferred copy shop. Share the approved list of copy shops.
  • Reserve Services in many U of T libraries can find durable links for required readings and make those available through the Library Resources page in Blackboard. Media Commons staff can help with video copyright questions.
  • We might already have a license for this.
  • Is the person posting the item that you want to use the actual copyright owner?
  • Remember fair dealing and refer to the U of T Fair Dealing Guidelines.
  • Would a substitute be ok?  Find alternatives to restricted materials or images.
  • Remind instructors that reducing course packs can save students money – a  good thing.
  • If it’s not clear to you, send it up the chain to Bobby.

 

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