Infographic – University of Toronto Research and Innovation Ecosystem

An infographic about the University of Toronto’s Research and Innovation Ecosystem has been published by the Office of the Vice-President, Research and Innovation.

The infographic illustrates the relationships between funding support, research, innovation, teaching, and community engagement at U of T. It includes lots of great statistics about the university!

Thank you to Klara Maidenberg for sharing this.

Introduction to Elsevier’s CiteScore

Liaisons and other librarians working with faculty should be aware of Elsevier’s recent release of a new  bibliometric, called the CiteScore Index (CSI). This metric will be a direct competitor to Thomson Reuters’ (now Clarivate Analytics’) ubiquitous Journal Impact Factor (JIF). The metrics are similar in that they both purport to measure the impact of academic journals based on the ratio between citable content published in the journal to citations to the journal.

While the JIF is based on content indexed in the Web of Science database, CSI will be based on the content in Scopus, which indexes a significantly larger number of titles (22,000 titles compared to 11,000).

If a journal’s impact is a consistent and measurable attribute, it stands to logic that its impact rank and score would be very similar regardless of who calculates the metric. However, preliminary analyses are showing that this is not the case. Librarians might wish to read the findings of early comparisons by Carl T. Bergstrom and Jevin West (developers of yet another metric, the EigenFactor). Surprising no one, they report that Elsevier journals seem to enjoy a boost in ranking using the new CiteScore, while the scores for Nature and Springer journals (now owned by the same company, and a major competitor to Elsevier journals in the space) are lower than what you might expect given their Impact Factors. Additionally, journals published by Emerald, which performed poorly compared to journals from other publishers in the same disciplines during our own analysis, have also seen a boost from the new metric.

These findings underscore the fact that reputational metrics are neither impartial nor objective and are subject to the influences of the entities that produce them. Librarians should be prepared to engage in critical evaluation of these metrics and to answer questions from faculty.

(Thank you to Klara Maidenberg, Assessment Librarian, for providing this information.)

Get to Know Your Functional Specialists – Liaison Update Forum

The Liaison Update Forum on Oct. 4 featured short presentations by UTL’s functional specialists, who explained what they do and how their services can be useful to liaisons. Below is a list of speakers and any slides or resources they provided with their presentation.

Suggestions for Improving the Connection between Functional and Liaison Librarians

At table discussions after the presentations, a number of suggestions came forward on how to advance collaborations between functional specialists and liaison librarians:

  • invite liaisons who may not regularly teach, to co-teach or be present during information literacy workshops
  • create a directory of functional specialists in Confluence
  • functionals could do more with liaison clusters during the pilot – come in to talk more about opportunities
  • highlight some of the tools that liaisons could promote or use (e.g. Omeka, Islandora)  as spotlight articles in In the Loop – a way of showcasing these tools to staff who may not be aware of them
  • create a visualization/flow chart of a digital project, from genesis to execution – to illustrate how projects come to be, and the path to execution and completion. This could serve as a model to faculty members who may want to make their own collections of content/images available online.
  • Add the work of functional specialists to the Library Resources for Faculty guide, to better highlight their work and increase awareness

Graduate student focus group on the libraries

In spring 2016, the School of Graduate Studies (SGS) held focus groups for first-year Master and PhD students to learn more about this cohort’s needs. The first focus group topic was about library resources and services, and seven students attended to share their experiences. Guided questions to get the group thinking about their library experiences were as follows:

  1. What type of challenges do you face when looking for or using information and research?
  2. Talk to us about how you use the library – both physically and virtually.
  3. What would you like to see offered at the library?
  4. What are your frustrations in using the library?

This focus group activity was an opportunity for the libraries to think about how graduate students find and use research help, and how we can make this process easier. The SGS graduate student focus group feedback slides, which were presented at the July Library Teaching & Learning Committee meeting and the August Reference Services Committee meeting, outline the key findings.

Using short stories and drawings in information literacy instruction

From Navroop Gill:

Yesterday [June 16] at our meeting, I shared a little about the speakers I had seen at WILU, David Brier & Vicky Lebbin who are at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Their approach to information literacy incorporates short stories and drawings which they have found to be highly engaging methods for students.

I’ve attached their handouts which provide ideas of how to structure lessons using these techniques ( just a note: they had read through hundreds of short stories to find ones that were suitable for IL!)

Their articles if you’re interested:

Brier, D. J., & Lebbin, V. K. (2015). Learning information literacy through drawing. Reference Services Review, 43(1), 45-67 http://simplelink.library.utoronto.ca/url.cfm/505223

Brier, D. J., & Lebbin, V. K. (2004). Teaching information literacy using the short story. Reference Services Review, 32(4), 381-385. doi:10.1108/00907320410569734 http://simplelink.library.utoronto.ca/url.cfm/505227

 

Proquest Databases @ U of T – Liaison Update Forum

Links and materials from the June 14 2016 Liaison Update Forum to review methodologies and communications options related to the discontinuation of selected Proquest databases.

  • Library web site: “Libraries approach to collection building” (includes links to Confluence-posted content for library staff)
  • Presentation slides: PQC methodology June14
  • Proquest Central documentation (in Confluence)
  • Sample questions and responses from today’s discussion: Each scenario was reviewed by a small group of librarians, who developed a strategy for response.  The responses were shared with the entire meeting for additional suggestions and changes.
Scenario 1 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 1 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 2 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 2 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 3 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 3 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 4 Group 2 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 4 Group 2 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 4 Group 1 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 4 Group 1 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 5 (click to enlarge)

Scenario 5 (click to enlarge)

SPARC-CARL Webinar on Supports for Tri-Agency Policy

Now Online: SPARC-CARL Webinar on Supports for Tri-Agency Policy

The recording and slides of the SPARC-CARL Webinar, “Library and Research Services Supports for the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications,” are now available on the CARL website. / / L’enregistrement et les diapositives du webinaire de SPARC et de l’ABRC, « Politique des trois organismes sur le libre accès aux publications : Soutien offert aux chercheurs par les bibliothèques académiques et les services de recherche universitaire » sont maintenant disponibles sur le site web de l’ABRC. Session en français  English-language session

Webinar: Research Impact Metrics for Librarians

Thank you to all of you who attended today’s webinar on research metrics, Research impact metrics for librarians: calculation & context | May 19, 2016.  This was a great overview of the challenges of metrics. Although the presentation focused on sciences, the content of the slides may be helpful to all of us who need to become better acquainted with benefits and limitations of key metrics tools.

You can now view the presentation on demand at your convenience with audio.

Additional documents: